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Weekly Tanker Market Monitor: Week 30, 2023

This article examines recent progress and initiatives by the shipping industry to meet new IMO targets and provides Signal Ocean Platform data on emissions developments and trends.

The Signal Group
April 2, 2024
Crude oil flows from AG to China have been fluctuating at a lower level since the last peak in mid-April
Data Source: https://app.signalocean.com/tanker/dynamic/oilflows

In the last days of July, the outlook for crude oil freight rates showed signs of weakness as the growth of demand in tonne days continued to decline. Additionally, the daily 25-day moving average of crude oil flows from Arabian Gulf countries to China has been consistently decreasing since its peak in mid-April. During July, the volume of oil flows reached levels even lower than those recorded in the previous year.

The downward trend in the daily 25-day moving average of crude oil flows from the Arabian Gulf to China highlights a reduction in oil trade between these regions, potentially reflecting changes in oil supply sources or a shift in China's energy import strategy. The combination of these factors points to a challenging period for the crude oil shipping industry. As demand continues to weaken and oil flows to China decrease, freight rates may face further pressure. 

As for oil demand growth, there is optimism about stronger growth, which is fueling sentiment for a rebound in prices. Goldman Sachs has made a bullish projection for the oil market, foreseeing an unprecedented surge in demand that will create a substantial deficit. According to the investment bank's forecasts, the demand for oil is expected to reach an all-time high, leaving a significant gap between supply and demand. Currently hovering slightly above $80 per barrel, the bank predicts that Brent crude will experience a further uptick, soaring to $86 per barrel as the year draws to a close. This optimistic outlook indicates a potential price rally in the oil markets, which could have significant implications for various industries and economies worldwide.

For more information on this week's trends or if you wish to subscribe to our FREE weekly market trends email, please contact us: research@thesignalgroup.com

-Republishing is allowed with an active link to the source

Creating a sustainable world requires us to embark on a journey towards a zero emission future, where every step is a commitment to preserve our planet for future generations.
Albert Greenway
Environmental Scientist, Sustainability Expert
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Increased Use of Renewable Energy:

Shipping companies are embracing renewable energy sources to power onboard systems and reduce emissions during port operations. Solar panels and wind turbines are being installed on vessels to generate clean energy, reducing reliance on auxiliary engines, and cutting down emissions. Shore power facilities in ports allow ships to connect to the electrical grid, eliminating the need for onboard generators while docked.

Collaboration and Industry Partnerships:

Recognizing that addressing emissions requires collective action, shipping companies, governments, and organizations have formed partnerships and collaborations. These initiatives focus on research and development, sharing best practices, and promoting knowledge transfer. Joint projects aim to develop and deploy innovative technologies, improve infrastructure, and create a supportive regulatory framework to accelerate the industry's transition towards a greener future. The Zero Emission Shipping - Mission Innovation.

To pave the way for a greener future in shipping, the availability of alternative fuels plays a vital role in their widespread adoption. However, this availability is influenced by factors such as port infrastructure, local regulations, and government policies. As the demand for cleaner fuels in shipping rises and environmental regulations become more stringent, efforts are underway to improve the accessibility of these fuels through infrastructure development, collaborations, and investments in production facilities.

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) infrastructure has seen significant growth in recent years, resulting in more LNG bunkering facilities and LNG-powered vessels. Nonetheless, the availability of LNG as a marine fuel can still vary depending on the region. To ensure consistent availability worldwide, there is a need for further development of LNG supply chains and infrastructure. For biofuels, their availability hinges on production capacity and the availability of feedstock. Although biofuels are being produced and utilized in various sectors, their availability as a marine fuel remains limited. Scaling up biofuel production and establishing robust supply chains are imperative to ensure wider availability within the shipping industry.Hydrogen, as a fuel for maritime applications, is still in the early stages of infrastructure development. While some hydrogen vessels have been tested or introduced in the first quarter of last year, the infrastructure required for hydrogen production and distribution needs further advancement.

Ammonia, as a marine fuel, currently faces limitations in availability. The production, storage, and handling infrastructure for ammonia need further development to support its widespread use in the shipping industry.Methanol, on the other hand, is already a commercially available fuel and has been used as a blend with conventional fuels in some ships. However, its availability as a standalone marine fuel can still be limited in certain regions. Bureau Veritas in October 2022 published a White Paper for the Alternative Fuels Outlook. This white paper provides a comprehensive overview of alternative fuels for the shipping industry, taking into account key factors such as technological maturity, availability, safety, emissions, and regulations.

Creating a sustainable world requires us to embark on a journey towards a zero emission future, where every step is a commitment to preserve our planet for future generations.
Albert Greenway
Environmental Scientist, Sustainability Expert

Increased Use of Renewable Energy:

Shipping companies are embracing renewable energy sources to power onboard systems and reduce emissions during port operations. Solar panels and wind turbines are being installed on vessels to generate clean energy, reducing reliance on auxiliary engines, and cutting down emissions. Shore power facilities in ports allow ships to connect to the electrical grid, eliminating the need for onboard generators while docked.

Collaboration and Industry Partnerships:

Recognizing that addressing emissions requires collective action, shipping companies, governments, and organizations have formed partnerships and collaborations. These initiatives focus on research and development, sharing best practices, and promoting knowledge transfer. Joint projects aim to develop and deploy innovative technologies, improve infrastructure, and create a supportive regulatory framework to accelerate the industry's transition towards a greener future. The Zero Emission Shipping - Mission Innovation.

To pave the way for a greener future in shipping, the availability of alternative fuels plays a vital role in their widespread adoption. However, this availability is influenced by factors such as port infrastructure, local regulations, and government policies. As the demand for cleaner fuels in shipping rises and environmental regulations become more stringent, efforts are underway to improve the accessibility of these fuels through infrastructure development, collaborations, and investments in production facilities.

Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) infrastructure has seen significant growth in recent years, resulting in more LNG bunkering facilities and LNG-powered vessels. Nonetheless, the availability of LNG as a marine fuel can still vary depending on the region. To ensure consistent availability worldwide, there is a need for further development of LNG supply chains and infrastructure. For biofuels, their availability hinges on production capacity and the availability of feedstock. Although biofuels are being produced and utilized in various sectors, their availability as a marine fuel remains limited. Scaling up biofuel production and establishing robust supply chains are imperative to ensure wider availability within the shipping industry.Hydrogen, as a fuel for maritime applications, is still in the early stages of infrastructure development. While some hydrogen vessels have been tested or introduced in the first quarter of last year, the infrastructure required for hydrogen production and distribution needs further advancement.

Ammonia, as a marine fuel, currently faces limitations in availability. The production, storage, and handling infrastructure for ammonia need further development to support its widespread use in the shipping industry.Methanol, on the other hand, is already a commercially available fuel and has been used as a blend with conventional fuels in some ships. However, its availability as a standalone marine fuel can still be limited in certain regions. Bureau Veritas in October 2022 published a White Paper for the Alternative Fuels Outlook. This white paper provides a comprehensive overview of alternative fuels for the shipping industry, taking into account key factors such as technological maturity, availability, safety, emissions, and regulations.

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Weekly Tanker Market Monitor: Week 30, 2023

Posted by
Maria Bertzeletou
|
July 27, 2023
Crude oil flows from AG to China have been fluctuating at a lower level since the last peak in mid-April
Data Source: https://app.signalocean.com/tanker/dynamic/oilflows

In the last days of July, the outlook for crude oil freight rates showed signs of weakness as the growth of demand in tonne days continued to decline. Additionally, the daily 25-day moving average of crude oil flows from Arabian Gulf countries to China has been consistently decreasing since its peak in mid-April. During July, the volume of oil flows reached levels even lower than those recorded in the previous year.

The downward trend in the daily 25-day moving average of crude oil flows from the Arabian Gulf to China highlights a reduction in oil trade between these regions, potentially reflecting changes in oil supply sources or a shift in China's energy import strategy. The combination of these factors points to a challenging period for the crude oil shipping industry. As demand continues to weaken and oil flows to China decrease, freight rates may face further pressure. 

As for oil demand growth, there is optimism about stronger growth, which is fueling sentiment for a rebound in prices. Goldman Sachs has made a bullish projection for the oil market, foreseeing an unprecedented surge in demand that will create a substantial deficit. According to the investment bank's forecasts, the demand for oil is expected to reach an all-time high, leaving a significant gap between supply and demand. Currently hovering slightly above $80 per barrel, the bank predicts that Brent crude will experience a further uptick, soaring to $86 per barrel as the year draws to a close. This optimistic outlook indicates a potential price rally in the oil markets, which could have significant implications for various industries and economies worldwide.

For more information on this week's trends or if you wish to subscribe to our FREE weekly market trends email, please contact us: research@thesignalgroup.com

-Republishing is allowed with an active link to the source

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